Free PDF: Co-Creating Knowledge Online

Co-Creating Knowledge Online cover

Co-Creating Knowledge Online is the second booklet in a series of Internet field guides (formerly “critical guides”) I have developed for community artists and culture makers. It is for those who are interested in better utilising the Internet to connect, share, and make new knowledge. It builds on the premise that people have become increasingly networked as individuals rather than in groups, and that these new ways of connecting enable new modes of peer-to-peer co-creation. It is an attempt to translate my PhD research findings for community arts practitioners, and was inspired by the practices of CuriousWorks.

The booklet is available as a free PDF in beta. If you download it, please leave a comment on this post regarding why the booklet is of interest to you. If you provide feedback about the booklet, I will include your name (and your link of choice) in the list of contributors on the project website. The guide is CC licensed for re-purposing. Enjoy!

  Co-Creating Knowledge Online (584.0 KiB, 793 hits)

P.S. Thanks so much to everyone who fed back during the beta-release of my first booklet, Appropriate Approaches to Online Community (previous post on this blog).

Free PDF: Appropriate Approaches to Online Community

Appropriate Approaches to Online Community is the title of the first booklet in a series of critical guides I have been developing for community artists. It is an experiment that attempts to translate some of my PhD research findings. The booklet was inspired and informed by a period of fieldwork at CuriousWorks.

The guide explores multiple aspects of making online community networks, so that practitioners might develop appropriate Internet practices – network solutions that take the specific needs of individuals and communities in to consideration. The guide promotes critical approaches to online community building, to encourage the continuation of creative practices beyond community arts projects.

The booklet is available as a free PDF. If you download it, please leave a comment on this post regarding why the booklet is of interest to you (this will REALLY, REALLY help me to evaluate the project). The guide is also CC licensed for re-purposing if you’d like to remix it. Go on…

  Appropriate Approaches to Online Community (571.6 KiB, 556 hits)

Bringing Interoperability to Kids’ Construction Toys

There is so much that is good about this project. Prepare to be blown away (the following blurb is from the F.A.T. Lab website):

“F.A.T. Lab and Sy-Lab are pleased to present the Free Universal Construction Kit: a matrix of nearly 80 adapter bricks that enable complete interoperability between ten* popular children’s construction toys. By allowing any piece to join to any other, the Kit encourages totally new forms of intercourse between otherwise closed systems—enabling radically hybrid constructive play, the creation of previously impossible designs, and ultimately, more creative opportunities for kids. As with other grassroots interoperability remedies, the Free Universal Construction Kit implements proprietary protocols in order to provide a public service unmet—or unmeetable—by corporate interests. The Free Universal Construction Kit offers adapters between Lego, Duplo, Fischertechnik, Gears! Gears! Gears!, K’Nex, Krinkles (Bristle Blocks), Lincoln Logs, Tinkertoys, Zome, and Zoob. Our adapters can be downloaded from Thingiverse.com and other sharing sites as a set of 3D models in .STL format, suitable for reproduction by personal manufacturing devices like the Makerbot (an inexpensive, open-source 3D printer).”

Unlike Us: Adjacent Communities and the Adjacent Possible

Last week I attended Unlike Us, a conference exploring alternatives to social media monopolies. Held in Amsterdam and hosted by the Institute of Network Cultures, it brought together communities of academics, artists, designers, educators, and activists, who share an interest in developing alternative code and cultures around social media.

The event proved identity affirming for me, as it brought together the disparate elements of my work practice, around subject matter I’m really interested in. I witnessed some excellent debates about the politics of centralization and decentralization; the politics of assuming different identities in social media networks; and, the problems with defining relationships in code.

Unsurprisingly, Facebook received a lot of attention. Anne Helmond’s and Carolin Gerlitz’s ‘Reworking the Fabric of the web: The Like Economy’ was a stand out presentation, as was Harry Halpin’s ‘Hidden History of the Like Button’. PhD researcher Frederick Borgesius also gave a fascinating talk about behavioral targeting and how advertisers are buying audiences through data profiles.

It wasn’t a huge surprise that Unlike Us appealed to me. I have always really enjoyed events that bring together different groups that are adjacent in proximity but have few opportunities to cross-pollinate. I like these opportunities as they give me a glimpse of what Stuart Kaufmann calls the adjacent possible: “a kind of shadow future, hovering on the edges of the present state of things, a map of all the ways in which the present can reinvent itself.”

The adjacent possibilities that emerged from the gathering of these adjacent communities, involved new thinking, new software platforms, new ways of organising and new modes of coalition building. The different approaches people were taking to advance critical thinking and practices around social media alternatives – from software protocol development to digital literacy education to network theory – revealed a need in my mind to be involved in more initiatives that facilitate collaboration between adjacent communities.